Florida test scores, end of course exam results due this week

cap-and-diploma-533027-mSchool may be out for summer, but final grades for most high schoolers are not. They can’t be calculated until the scores come back on Florida’s various end-of-course exams, which by law must account for 30 percent of a course grade.

The courses:  Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Biology, U.S. History and Civics.

By law, those scores (and the Florida Standards Assessment results) are supposed to be released this week – the week of June 8.

Some have expressed concern for some of the more than 12,000 students who graduated in recent weeks. Right now, their transcripts are stamped “unofficial.” Are they able to proceed to college courses this summer without a final grade?

Palm Beach State College spokeswoman Grace Truman says they can at PBSC.

“We give them an override for two semesters because they can enroll now for the fall as well,” Truman said. “We don’t wait for them to have it in hand. In the past, we’d make them wait until Summer B (the second session of summer classes), but we don’t even do that now.”

Truman said PBSC, which began summer classes May 16, counts nearly 21,000 students enrolled this summer, a four percent growth over last year. That is contrary to what she said was a statewide trend of lower enrollments.

Florida Atlantic University officials say they too are OK with graduates enrolling in summer with unofficial transcripts.

Is there a statewide policy for the institutions in the state university system? No. Each university is handling it locally. “Our feedback from the universities admissions directors is that this is not an issue – they work with the student,” a spokeswoman from the State University System of Florida said in an email Thursday morning.

The Trump gets fact-checked on the Common Core

Donald Trump (Bill Ingram/ The Palm Beach Post)
Donald Trump (Bill Ingram/ The Palm Beach Post)

At the GOP debate in Miami Thursday night, Donald Trump said Common Core is “education through Washington D.C.”

In this election season he isn’t the first to vilify the education standards that have been adopted by 42 states. Florida adopted Common Core standards in 2010 and then tweaked and renamed them the Florida State Standards in 2014 after public opposition. 

Which brings us to Trump’s declaration that Washington and the federal government are behind the Common Core standards.

The fact-checking website PolitiFace that rates the accuracy of statement by politicians rated this one False.

In their analysis, the fact checkers go to the history of Common Core – state education officials who wanted to create standards that set the same academic goals for students across states — so teachers would aim to impart the same knowledge and skills to students in Florida as they would in California or Massachussetts.  (Theirs has more detail.)

They also note that it’s been up to states to then adopt the standards.

When it comes to the feds, Politifact said:

Washington has done a bit to encourage states to adopt the standards. President Barack Obama’s signature education program, Race to the Top, gave states that have adopted a set of standards extra points (40 of a possible 500) when competing for grants.

But the federal government didn’t help create the standards, and has no control over how they’re implemented. Even states that have adopted the standards are still free to set their own curricula.

In short, it doesn’t matter who the president is because there’s not much the federal government can do about Common Core.