Fidget spinners banned in this PBC school. How ’bout yours?

This meme of this year’s fads is making the rounds with teachers.

Earlier this month, Superintendent Robert Avossa admitted that, yes, his children, ages 11 and 14, own fidget spinners.

Every teacher in the country is likely familiar with these pocket-sized gadgets which you can twirl between fingers – so familiar that already schools across the country have banned them. (By the calculations of Alexi Roy at spinnerlist.com, that includes 63 of the largest high schools in the country.)

And at least one industrious student has opened a change.org account in pursuit of reversing that ruling – 34 supporters so far.

 

Avossa said during this public admission – really a press conference about something else entirely – there’s no district-wide policy regarding spinners. That’s a decision left with principals.

But at least one school, Palm Beach Public, has lowered the boom. To paraphrase the email to parents Friday:  If your child owns one, keep it at home, please.

It’s not as if anyone needs an excuse to get in on the trend, but the spin on spinners has been that it helps people – people with anxiety or attention deficit disorder – focus.

That spin, however,  is dubious, Duke University professor and clinical psychologist Scott Kollins told NPR this week.

“I know there’s lots of similar toys, just like there’s lots of other games and products marketed toward individuals who have ADHD, and there’s basically no scientific evidence that those things work across the board,” Kollins said.

This bit of news has yet to put a dent in fidget demand – at least not at my house, or apparently, the superintendent’s.

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